Just another WordPress.com weblog

Posts tagged ‘sculpture’

Paper Mache Puppets Grade 3

2014-05-13 14.56.16 puppet

We haven’t made paper mache puppets in ages due to the time consuming steps involved.  Eliminating the paint/dry/paint steps saved work time and prep time.  Students started with a styrofoam ball and then added Model Magic to form animal heads.  They carefully wrapped the heads in aluminum foil to hold the Model Magic in place.  Ears were cut from cardboard, covered in foil and then taped to the head.  I had to cut slits in the head to hold some of the wobbly ears.  Students added 2 layers of tissue paper and Mod Podge for color.  Felt scraps, fun foam shapes, wiggly eyes, pom poms and chenille stems were available for the details.

2013-11-07 16.11.02   2013-11-07 09.58.08

An old pencil inserted into the styrofoam acts as a handle.

We stuck the pencils in a styrofoam block to dry the heads.

 

 

Model Magic Penguins

ImageImage

Second graders combined simple forms to create these adorable penguins.  They practiced rolling spheres which they flattened to create the eyes and belly.  An egg shape was formed for the body.  Two smaller egg shapes were flattened for wings.   The beak was a flattened cone.

Metallic paper and fiberfill were used for ice and snow.  Students added eggs and fish for interest.

Henry Moore Sculpture

Third graders critiqued the work of Henry Moore, noting the organic positive and negative shapes. of his sculptures.  They used oil clay to work out their idea of a flowing organic shape that seems to grow.  An interesting negative shape was started with a milkshake straw.  White clay was used for the final sculpture.  A coat of black acrylic paint was allowed to dry, then metallic acrylic paint was sponged on.  Students turned their sculptures to determine the most interesting view.  The sculptures were glued on to a scrap of wood that had been painted black.

This project was inspired by the Alum Creek site on Artsonia.

Snowy Trees

Second and third graders created these wonderful winter sculptures in 2 classes.  The tree was formed from a paper lunch bag.  Five parallel slits were cut from the opening of the bag to its midpoint.  The bag was carefully opened.  The trunk was formed by twisting the bag from the bottom up to the slits.  Several strips were held together and twisted to form each branch.  After gluing the tree to a base, fluffy fiberfil was used for snow.

Students created the animals from small bits of Model Magic.  I demonstrated how to model a simple animal and bird and provided photos of skunks, dogs, bunnies, etc.   Each table had an egg carton with bits of colored Model Magic.  Students were encouraged to add interesting details to their animals.  A bottle cap of tacky glue was provided,  along with toothpicks for scooping up tiny dabs of glue.

Sprinkling snow glitter on the snow, or dabbing glitter glaze on the branches, adds a sparkling touch if time allows.

Stickmen Gr. 4

This fourth grade recycled art lesson started with a rectangle of corrugated cardboard.  Twigs were dipped in glue and inserted into the grooves to form arms and legs.

The mask was made of self hardening clay.  Toothpicks and broken q-tips were used to press in textures.  A broken q-tip was just the right thickness for the neck.  The dried masks were held by the q-tip and dipped into a cup of diluted black acrylic paint.  Metallic acrylic paint was sponged onto the dried mask for color.

The q-tip neck was inserted into a bead, dipped in glue, then inserted into the top of the body.  Fabric scraps were wrapped around the body and secured with raffia.  Students could add beads to the belt, or beaded necklaces.  A few feathers were glue to the back of the head.

This project was first seen on the Alum Creek PTO Gallery.

Mousepaint

These little mice were made by kindergarten students after reading the story Mousepaint.  They blended  red, yellow and blue Model Magic to create orange, green and violet.  Each mouse was made by rolling a chubby teardrop of Model Magic.  Standing mice had a  nose pinched out.  Ears were made by flattening 2 little balls of  clay.  Wire whiskers and chenille stem tails were poked into place.  The tip of a new Sharpie was dabbed on for the eyes and nose.

Little puddles of primary colors were done in marker.  The mice are held in place with white glue.

Recycled Art Cat

My first graders loved constructing adorable cats.   Students cut out the head and legs from thin cardboard scraps. Tacky glue was used to attach the pieces.  When dry, the cats were painted with a single color.  Another color was added to create a calico or tabby cat.  Jumbo chenille stems were the perfect thickness for tails.  The tails could be bent into different poses. Students used chenille stem whiskers that were black, white, or one of the cat’s colors.  The whiskers were inserted into a bead for the nose, which was held in place with tacky glue.    Black Sharpie was used for the mouth, and the eyes were glued on.

This lesson was on Fem Manuals blog.