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Posts tagged ‘grade four’

Henna Hands

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Fourth graders created these scratch art hands as part of a unit on the art of India.  They looked at images of henna hands and henna designs for inspiration.  This was their first experience using a wooden stylus to etch through scratch art paper.  They took great care with the new process.  Objectives included etching precise lines, balancing light and dark areas, and filling the space.  They cut a freehand border after using a glue stick to attach the hand to colored paper.  Next time I will allow students to lightly pencil in a border before cutting.

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Textured Clay Fish Grade 4

Fourth graders practiced drawing fish and fish parts before creating a template for their clay piece.  They rolled out a slab of clay, placed their template on top, then used a fettling knife to trim away excess clay.  Students were instructed to use tools and found objects to press in contrasting textures.  The fired fish were painted using a limited palette of metallic acrylic paints.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexican Coco Suns

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Mexican coco suns inspired these 4th grade sculptures.  The suns were constructed by combining  paper bowls with trimmed pizza rounds.   Color was added by adhering bits of brightly colored tissue paper with Mod Podge.  Permanent markers and paint pens were used for details.

 

 

 

 

 

Pop Art Sandwich

Giant food is a favorite subject for my fourth graders.   This 18″ x 24″ sandwich was created during our study of  Claus Oldenburg.  Students viewed and discussed his  Pop Art sculptures.  They learned how his early jobs influenced his giant hamburger soft sculpture.  Groups brainstormed sandwich fillings before getting started.  Meats, cheeses, veggies and sauces were were cut from colored paper.  Repetition and contrast were stressed.   Students waited to glue until all pieces were cut and arranged.

Stickmen Gr. 4

This fourth grade recycled art lesson started with a rectangle of corrugated cardboard.  Twigs were dipped in glue and inserted into the grooves to form arms and legs.

The mask was made of self hardening clay.  Toothpicks and broken q-tips were used to press in textures.  A broken q-tip was just the right thickness for the neck.  The dried masks were held by the q-tip and dipped into a cup of diluted black acrylic paint.  Metallic acrylic paint was sponged onto the dried mask for color.

The q-tip neck was inserted into a bead, dipped in glue, then inserted into the top of the body.  Fabric scraps were wrapped around the body and secured with raffia.  Students could add beads to the belt, or beaded necklaces.  A few feathers were glue to the back of the head.

This project was first seen on the Alum Creek PTO Gallery.