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Posts tagged ‘grade 3 art lesson’

Pysanky

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Second and third graders designed a glowing Pysanky using chalk on black paper.  Reading Rainbows Reshenka’s Eggs was the inspiration for these beautiful drawings.  The author demonstrated the process of using dyes and wax to create the traditional Ukrainian eggs.  We examined Pysankys to note the basic format of the design.  Students used double horizontal, vertical or diagonal lines to set up their design.  They added traditional Pysanky lines and motifs to create symmetrical images.  During the demonstration I showed how to hold the chalk before dipping the. tip into water.  I reminded students to keep hands off any colored areas to avoid smudges.  They used a kneaded eraser to clean up the few smudges.  Ambrite chalk produces the most vibrant colors compared to the other brands I have used.

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Students used their own water cup and shared chalk with a partner.

Egyptian Mummies

Ancient Egyptian mummies were the focus of our third grade art history unit.  Students watched a Reading Rainbow, Mummies Made in Egypt, to learn about mummification.  They used a template for the main shape of a Pharoah or Queen, then drew their own face, head piece, collar and bands.    Bold Crayola markers were used to color bands across the mummies.  Egyptian motifs were added with gold paint pens.  Students were instructed to vary their patterns in terms of size, shape and amount of gold.

Henry Moore Sculpture

Third graders critiqued the work of Henry Moore, noting the organic positive and negative shapes. of his sculptures.  They used oil clay to work out their idea of a flowing organic shape that seems to grow.  An interesting negative shape was started with a milkshake straw.  White clay was used for the final sculpture.  A coat of black acrylic paint was allowed to dry, then metallic acrylic paint was sponged on.  Students turned their sculptures to determine the most interesting view.  The sculptures were glued on to a scrap of wood that had been painted black.

This project was inspired by the Alum Creek site on Artsonia.