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Posts tagged ‘craypas’

Royal Portraits Grade 2

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We started this lesson with a brief power point about the Middle Ages.  Students viewed images of castles, queens, kings, knights, armor, tapestries and illuminated letters.  Students worked on 16 x 20″ pages of heavy peach  paper.  To ensure the portrait was large, I had students create their own oval face template on scrap paper.  They traced the oval lightly in chalk onto the large paper.  From that point on, the students used black tempera to add the face, crown and clothing.  We looked at examples of kings and queens for ideas when designing the crown and royal clothing.  Students used jumbo craypas to add color.  The final step was to use the sides of broken craypas to layer color in the background.  White was used to provide contrast between the portrait and background.

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Polar Express

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This lesson focused on the artist as illustrator.  First graders were asked to illustrate the Polar Express as part of an integrated lesson.  They first looked at photos of the Polar Express and toy trains.  They identified simple shapes and how they were put together before drawing their own.  Students drew with jumbo white craypas.  They included an engine, cars, snow bank, pine trees, a moon and falling snow.  They had to take care not to smudge when adding color with craypas.

Patriotic Eagles Grade 4

This lesson was a huge success in my art classes.  The structure of drawing from a photograph combined with the freedom in designing the background appealed to all students.

Fourth graders drew an eagle in profile by working from a photograph.  They added a patriotic background that included stars and stripes, and red, white and blue.  Students worked with oil pastels on black paper.

Tracy Albert, from May Whitney School in Lake Zurich, developed this lesson.

Snowy Forest Grade 4

White craypas were used to draw a cluster of pine trees on a snowbank.  White chalk was applied heavily to the edges of a tagboard oval.  The oval was placed over the trees, then a tissue was used to smudge the chalk from the center out.  A dusting of tempera snow was spattered on with a toothbrush rubbed against a screen.

Wild Things by Grade 2

These wonderful creatures were inspired by the book Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  Second graders combined animal parts to design their own Wild Thing.  They started with a large head near the top of the page.  A wide array of animal parts appeared in the classroom:  beaks, feathers, horns, teeth, ears, manes, wings, legs, tails, and more.  Patterns added interest to the bodies.   Students painted directly on the paper to keep the work spontaneous.  They were instructed to “dress up their mess up” and work unwanted lines into the painting.  The next class was spent coloring inside the shapes with craypas.  When done, the Wild Things were cut out and glued to a colored background.

Kindergarten Still Life

Craypas and kindergarteners can turn a great idea into a smeary mess!  This beautiful flower still life was done by a kindergartener with craypas-and no smears.  As always, students were instructed to keep their hands from resting on the paper.  The secret to the success was the use of velour paper.  The texture helped keep the oil pastels from smearing.   Kids loved working on the soft paper.  Best of all, every drawing was absolutely beautiful.

Van Gogh Sunflowers

Van Gogh’s Sunflowers inspired this sunny composition.  Overlapping sunflowers were drawn in a variety of sizes.  A thick layer of blended craypas filled each flower.  Complimentary blue-violet watercolor was used in the background.