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Archive for the ‘4th Grade’ Category

Henna Hands

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Fourth graders created these scratch art hands as part of a unit on the art of India.  They looked at images of henna hands and henna designs for inspiration.  This was their first experience using a wooden stylus to etch through scratch art paper.  They took great care with the new process.  Objectives included etching precise lines, balancing light and dark areas, and filling the space.  They cut a freehand border after using a glue stick to attach the hand to colored paper.  Next time I will allow students to lightly pencil in a border before cutting.

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Nutcracker Portraits

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This December lesson was incredibly successful for 4 reasons:

1. Interest was high because every student was participating in our winter musical: The Nutcracker. 

2. The lesson was structured yet allowed for creative choices.

3. Every step and part was demonstrated.

4. GLITTER!!!

December lessons work best when presented in small, highly structured doses. Full color visuals were available at every table, charts of different parts were presented as needed, and real nutcrackers were on display for inspiration. Students chose 2 or 3 colors for the jacket and hat, just like teams use the same 2 or 3 colors for their uniforms and headgear.

Day 1-Jacket

  • Critique images of nutcrackers’ uniforms, noting colors, shapes, details, designs, etc.
  • Select colors from precut papers:   1 12″x 6″ for jacket,  2 4″ x 6″ pieces for the jacket center and shoulders, 1   2″ x 6″ piece for the very center of the jacket.
  • Glue the jacket and center pieces down.
  • Fold and trim the shoulder pieces and then glue into place.
  • Add sashes, medals, etc.

Day 2-Face

  • Select skin toned paper.  Trace and cut a circle. Glue onto the jacket, slightly overlapping the jacket.
  • Add cut paper/Sharpie eyes in the center of the face.  Add eyebrows with Sharpies. Refer to charts for samples.
  • Add cheeks if desired, using colored paper or colored pencils.
  • Draw a simple long triangle or circle nose in Sharpie.
  • Practice and draw a mustache under the nose.
  • Add a small red rectangle for the open mouth.  Cut teeth from white paper and glue into place.
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Day 3-Hat or crown and hair

  • Repeat at least 2 colors that were used in the jacket.
  • Cut a symmetrical hat or crown.
  • Add details with colored paper.
  • Draw hair with a Sharpie.

Day 3-Glitter/beard

  • Outline the entire headpiece with glue.  Make sure to have the glue TIP TOUCH paper to ensure a uniform line.
  • Outline shapes on the hat with glue, and add small glue shapes if desired.
  • Sprinkle glue on the entire hat all at once.
  • Shake off the extra glitter into a cup.
  • Outline all parts of the jacket with glue.  Include glue buttons and fringe.
  • Sprinkle glue on the entire jacket all at once.
  • Shake of the extra glue into a cup.
  • Add a faux fur beard along the bottom of the mouth.

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Tooled Metal Ornaments

Tooled Ornaments

Fourth graders stacked shapes to draw an old fashioned ornament.  They folded their sketch in half and then cut a symmetrical pattern.  The large shapes were broken into smaller shapes.  They taped their patterns to tooling foil.  Working on the soft surface of their sketchbooks, students traced over their lines with a stylus.  The ornament was then cut out.  To emboss, students outlined a shape on the front, gently used the stylus to “color” inside the shape on the back, then outlined the front again.  Students used 2 or 3 Sharpies to add color.

Symmetrical Ornaments Grade Four

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Fourth graders viewed examples of hand blown glass ornaments as the inspiration for this collage.  Students sketched an ornament by stacking ovals, rectangles, triangles, etc.  They folded their sketches in half vertically, then cut out the best side.  This pattern was traced onto the back of foil paper.  The ornaments were cut out and then decorated with smaller shapes.  Glitter was used to outline shapes and create decorative  lines and dots.   Glittering was done inside of a box lid to contain any spills.

 

 

Patriotic Eagles Grade 4

This lesson was a huge success in my art classes.  The structure of drawing from a photograph combined with the freedom in designing the background appealed to all students.

Fourth graders drew an eagle in profile by working from a photograph.  They added a patriotic background that included stars and stripes, and red, white and blue.  Students worked with oil pastels on black paper.

Tracy Albert, from May Whitney School in Lake Zurich, developed this lesson.

Textured Clay Fish Grade 4

Fourth graders practiced drawing fish and fish parts before creating a template for their clay piece.  They rolled out a slab of clay, placed their template on top, then used a fettling knife to trim away excess clay.  Students were instructed to use tools and found objects to press in contrasting textures.  The fired fish were painted using a limited palette of metallic acrylic paints.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The No-No Board

Here is my version of Mr. E’s No Board.  “Dress up your mess up” is a quote from one of my second graders that is heard often in my classroom. I encourage students to think of a “mistake” as a chance to try something new.  Every year we watch the Reading Rainbow episode Regina’s Big Mistake to reinforce this concept.